Blog Category: Breastfeeding support and Information

In the early weeks of breastfeeding, you may experience sore or tender nipples. Tender nipples from breastfeeding are normal during the first week or two. Establishing a proper latch from the start will minimize nipple soreness and help you and your baby get the most from your breastfeeding experience. Your breastfeeding comfort depends on where your nipple lands in baby’s mouth, and that depends on how your baby takes the breast, or latches on. Learning the correct latch takes practice for both you and baby and can be the difference between a painful, or wonderful, breastfeeding experience. To understand this better, use your tongue to feel the roof of your mouth. Behind your teeth are ridges, and behind those ridges the roof of your mouth feels hard. When your nipple is pressed against this hard area in your baby’s mouth, it can hurt. Don’t hesitate to seek the help of a Lactation consultant.   The “Comfort Zone” Further back in your mouth the roof turns from hard to soft. Near this is the area some call “the comfort zone.” Once your nipple reaches your baby’s comfort zone, there is no undue friction or pressure on your nipple and breastfeeding can become a pleasant experience. Laid Back Approach To make this happen, let gravity do the lion’s share of the work. • Lean back with good neck, shoulder, and back support and move your hips forward. • Lay your baby tummy-side down between your exposed breasts. When your now calm but hungry baby feels your body against their chin, torso, legs, and feet, it will trigger their inborn feeding reflexes. And as their chin touches your body, their mouth will open and they will begin to search for your breast. In these “laid-back positions,” gravity will help your nipple reach the comfort zone. Alternative Positions In other positions, you may need to work a little harder to help encourage a good latch and bring your nipple more deeply into your baby’s mouth to find that comfort zone. Use the following tips to help get your nipple to where you want it to be: • With your baby’s body pressed firmly against you and their nose in line with your nipple, let their head tilt back a bit (avoid pushing on the back of her head). • Allow their chin to touch your breast, then move away. • Repeat the first two steps until their mouth opens really wide, like a yawn. • As they move onto the breast chin first, gently press your baby’s shoulders from behind for a deeper latch. That last gentle shove will help your nipple reach the comfort zone. Breastfeeding tends to feel better when your baby latches on off-center, so the lower jaw lands far away from the nipple. Sore Cracked Nipples In the process of mastering the latch, you may experience pain and sore cracked nipples. If you feel nipple tenderness or discomfort, gel pads can prevent clothing friction and help soothe and heal your nipples. When choosing a gel pad, look for ones that you can wear in your bra like a nursing pad and that won’t stain your clothing. It is also worth investing in a good lanolin cream to provide immediate relief and soothe your sore nipples. We suggest choosing a cream that is natural and hypoallergenic so it’s safe for your baby. This way there is no need to remove it prior to breastfeeding. The cream should create a thick barrier to protect against further soreness. Happy Feeding! Related Products

Whether you are an exclusive pumper or you only pump occasionally, it’s important to know the do’s and don’ts of properly storing, freezing, and thawing your breast milk. What do I need to know about storing my breast milk? Here we’ll answer some frequently asked question as well as offer a few tips and tricks for storing and making the most out of your breast milk. What container should I use? • Glass bottles with a leak proof lid or hard BPA-free plastic bottles work really well. • Breast milk freezer bags are great if you’re travelling or have limited storage space available. Ameda Store n’ Pour bags are an excellent option and compatible will all Ameda kits. They allow you to pump directly into the bag, write the date, and pop it into your fridge or freezer. Avoid thin bottle liners. These are meant to be used as feeding bags, but not for freezing milk. The liners will often split when frozen. How much breast milk should I store? • Divide your milk into the smallest amounts your baby might take (e.g. snack size). You can always add milk if needed, but don’t save leftover milk after a feeding. When your baby takes a bottle, their saliva mixes with the milk which makes it unusable for future feedings. Storing smaller portions will reduce the possibility of having to discard any breast milk.   How long can I store my breast milk? • If you follow the times on the chart below, you can keep your milk at room temperature, refrigerate it, then freeze it. • Write the date and time on your milk container with a sticky label or non-toxic marker. Add your baby’s name if they are in daycare or in the hospital. • You can combine milk pumped at different times. When combining milk from different days, write the date of the oldest milk on the container. • If you plan to use your milk within 8 days, you can keep it in the fridge. Otherwise, freeze it in the coldest part of the freezer. Avoid storing in the door, the deeper into the freezer the better. • Fresh is best. If you have just finished pumping, give your freshly pumped milk to your baby before thawing a previously frozen milk. • Fresh milk  can be added to cooled milk. If you are using frozen milk, you can add to it but be sure it’s cooled first and there is less fresh than frozen. • Before freezing large amounts of milk, start with just a batch or two, thaw, and smell it. Some moms make milk high in lipase, an enzyme that digests fat. This type of breast milk has a strong, soapy smell when thawed. If this happens and your baby refuses the milk, you can deactivate the lipase before freezing by scalding the milk first. To scald your milk, heat it in a pot on the range until bubbles form at the edges, cool, and freeze. Why do some milk storage guidelines differ? Why can’t the experts agree? First, research confirms that your milk will not spoil before the times in the table below. But the longer your milk is stored, the more vitamins and antioxidants are lost. That’s why some breastfeeding books list shorter storage times. Those experts prefer you to use your milk sooner rather than later. But this doesn’t mean that your milk will spoil if you wait longer. It’s never a bad idea to give your milk as soon as you can after pumping. But what should you do if you find some stored milk in the back of the fridge that has been there for up to eight days? When in doubt about the freshness of your milk, smell or taste it. Spoiled milk will usually smell spoiled. Why do I need to warm my milk before feeding it to my baby? An older, larger baby can handle drinking chilled milk. But milk needs to be warm for a tiny baby. If a newborn is fed cold milk, it can bring down their body temperature. Younger babies need their milk warmed to between room and body temperature.   What should I know about warming and thawing my milk? • Whether you’re warming chilled milk or thawing frozen milk, keep the heat low. High heat kills the live cells in your milk that help keep your baby healthy. • Warm your milk to between room and body temperature under cool then warm running water. Be sure to keep the water away from the lid of the bottle so that it doesn’t mix with the milk. One method is to put the bottle in a bowl with sides lower than the bottle’s lid. Run warm water in the bowl. The warm water against the sides of the bottle warms the milk. • Frozen milk can be thawed in the refrigerator. • Your milk is not “homogenized” like the milk you buy at the supermarket so it may separate into layers. This is a natural occurrence and if it happens, simply give it a gentle swirl to mix. HERE ARE SOME “DON’TS” TO KEEP IN MIND: • Don’t warm breast milk in the microwave. It changes the composition of the milk and causes hot spots that can burn your baby’s mouth and throat. • Don’t heat the milk in a pot on the stove. High heat can make your breast milk too hot for your baby, and it destroys the antibodies your baby needs.

If you’re breastfeeding, it’s normal for your breasts to become larger, heavier, and a little tender when they begin making more milk. Engorgement, however, results when your breast milk builds up and the fullness leaves your breasts feeling hard, lumpy, and painful. When you’re engorged, you may also experience flattening of the nipple, breast tenderness, warmth, redness, throbbing, and swelling. It can sometimes even cause a low-grade fever and may be confused with a breast infection. It can happen at any time during your breastfeeding journey, but it’s most common during the third to fifth day after birth. Engorgement can sometimes lead to plugged ducts or a breast infection. So it’s important to try to prevent it before it occurs. When treated properly, you should feel relief within a couple of days. How to get relief A way to help reduce the risk of engorgement is to breastfeed often in the first few weeks. Allow your baby to feed as long as they like, ensuring they are latched on well with good suction. Some people suggest waking your baby to feed if four or more hours have passed since the beginning of the last feeding. However, opinions on this vary. You know your baby best and if they need to sleep longer, trust your gut and your killer “mom instincts”. They are usually right!  Tips & Tricks • Make sure you have a good latch. If you are having trouble or you feel things are not going well, contact your nearest Lactation Consultant or La Leche League. • Breastfeed often on the affected side to remove the milk, keep it moving freely, and prevent the breast from becoming overly full. • Avoid overusing pacifiers and using bottles to supplement feedings. • Hand express or use a manual pump to release a little milk to first soften the breast, areola, and nipple before breastfeeding. You could use an electric breast pump if you have one, but not for too long. Remember: more milk out = more milk made! Your body is trying to adjust and make the right amount for your little one.   • Massage the affected breast. Don’t be surprised if you notice milk leaking out. It’s completely normal and will most likely provide some relief. This method works well in a warm shower or after applying a warm compress. • Use a cold compresses in between feedings to help ease pain.   • If you are returning to work, try to pump your milk on the same schedule that your baby breastfed at home. Or, you can pump at least every four hours.   • Get enough rest, proper nutrition, and fluids. • Wear a well-fitting, supportive bra that is not too tight. • Use some breast pads if you feel that you might leak!   How long will it last? Engorgement usually doesn’t last more than a couple of days. In the meantime, the above tips should help provide some much needed relief. Once your body adjusts to the demands of your baby, you might have some leakage and a bit of soreness but not to the same extent and only for a short period. If you find you’re continuing to have pain or engorgement, contact a healthcare professional or your local breastfeeding support person. Related Products

There are a lot of considerations to take into account when choosing what breast pump will work for you. Determining in advance what your ideal breastfeeding experience looks like is great, but sometimes your body and baby have different plans. How will you know if you need a hospital-grade breast pump? There is no right way to breastfeed, and we all have different interpretations of our ideal breastfeeding journey. Some moms plan to breastfeed exclusively, some prefer to feed by both bottle and breast, and others may be planning to exclusively pump. All perfectly good options and worth considering when preparing for your baby’s arrival. However, before your baby arrives it’s near impossible to predict what unexpected plot twists may come into play affecting your unique breastfeeding experience. For example, what if your baby is premature? We suggest waiting until after the baby is born to purchase your pump. Manual, Electric, or Hospital Grade If your goal is to breastfeed, a manual pump for occasional expression may do the trick. If you are planning to feed your baby breast milk but not breastfeed, you will most likely want (and need!) a double electric pump. However, if your baby is premature, too sick to breastfeed, or if you have issues with low milk supply, a hospital grade pump is the best option. In these situations, we also highly recommend consulting a lactation consultant. What is a Hospital Grade Breast Pump Hospital-grade breast pumps provide top of the line pumping technology and are the ideal choice for mothers of multiples or pre-term infants. They are also the best pump option for moms who need help initiating lactation or increasing milk production. You can find hospital-grade pumps as rentals from hospitals, health units, and select pharmacies. Along with your breast pump, you will need to purchase a milk collection kit to use with the hospital pump. Long-term or Short-term Solution How long you continue to use a hospital-grade pump depends on your situation and your preference. You may only need to pump short-term until your milk comes in or baby can breastfeed on their own. Or you may continue to need or want the functions that a hospital grade pump offers such as more cycle speeds and more options for increasing milk production. Once your milk supply has been established, you can move on to the next phase. If you want to continue pumping, you can transition away from your hospital-grade pump to a personal-use pump. Look for personal breast pumps that use the same kits as their hospital-grade counterparts. This will eliminate the need to purchase brand new kits. For example, Ameda Elite or Ameda Platinum® hospital-grade pumps use the same collection kit as an Ameda Finesse personal-use breast pump. Undecided… If you’re still unsure about which breast pump to choose, renting a hospital-grade pump will most likely be your best option. It can help you decide if pumping is for you without the hefty price tag. Trying to decide which type of pump you need can be tough. Some considerations include milk contamination (open vs closed system), ease of use, and comfort while pumping. Consulting a breastfeeding specialist and talking to other moms helps offer insight, but ultimately only you know what kind of pump fits your needs. Purchasing a double electric pump can be a significant investment so you’ll want to ensure you make an informed decision. Remember, there is no right way to breastfeed your baby, even the best-laid plans can go awry. Sometimes you need to explore alternatives to help you give your baby your breast milk if you are unable. Good luck and happy feeding! Related Products