Blog Category: Breastfeeding support and Information

If you’re breastfeeding, it’s normal for your breasts to become larger, heavier, and a little tender when they begin making more milk. Engorgement, however, results when your breast milk builds up and the fullness leaves your breasts feeling hard, lumpy, and painful. When you’re engorged, you may also experience flattening of the nipple, breast tenderness, warmth, redness, throbbing, and swelling. It can sometimes even cause a low-grade fever and may be confused with a breast infection. It can happen at any time during your breastfeeding journey, but it’s most common during the third to fifth day after birth. Engorgement can sometimes lead to plugged ducts or a breast infection. So it’s important to try to prevent it before it occurs. When treated properly, you should feel relief within a couple of days. How to get relief A way to help reduce the risk of engorgement is to breastfeed often in the first few weeks. Allow your baby to feed as long as they like, ensuring they are latched on well with good suction. Some people suggest waking your baby to feed if four or more hours have passed since the beginning of the last feeding. However, opinions on this vary. You know your baby best and if they need to sleep longer, trust your gut and your killer “mom instincts”. They are usually right!  Tips & Tricks • Make sure you have a good latch. If you are having trouble or you feel things are not going well, contact your nearest Lactation Consultant or La Leche League. • Breastfeed often on the affected side to remove the milk, keep it moving freely, and prevent the breast from becoming overly full. • Avoid overusing pacifiers and using bottles to supplement feedings. • Hand express or use a manual pump to release a little milk to first soften the breast, areola, and nipple before breastfeeding. You could use an electric breast pump if you have one, but not for too long. Remember: more milk out = more milk made! Your body is trying to adjust and make the right amount for your little one.   • Massage the affected breast. Don’t be surprised if you notice milk leaking out. It’s completely normal and will most likely provide some relief. This method works well in a warm shower or after applying a warm compress. • Use a cold compresses in between feedings to help ease pain.   • If you are returning to work, try to pump your milk on the same schedule that your baby breastfed at home. Or, you can pump at least every four hours.   • Get enough rest, proper nutrition, and fluids. • Wear a well-fitting, supportive bra that is not too tight. • Use some breast pads if you feel that you might leak!   How long will it last? Engorgement usually doesn’t last more than a couple of days. In the meantime, the above tips should help provide some much needed relief. Once your body adjusts to the demands of your baby, you might have some leakage and a bit of soreness but not to the same extent and only for a short period. If you find you’re continuing to have pain or engorgement, contact a healthcare professional or your local breastfeeding support person. Related Products

Once you have your breast pump, you can start breast pumping and collecting milk any time. But be mindful, in the first two weeks after your baby is born, it’s best to pump occasionally to relieve engorgement – don’t get carried away! Pumping a lot in these early weeks tells your body that you had triplets. Your body will then reciprocate by producing an enormous amount of milk. Remember: more milk out = more milk made! While this may sound like a good thing, it will increase the likelihood of breast problems such as clogged ducts and engorgement. When your baby is a little older (2-3 weeks), and you are ready to start pumping regularly, you will most likely get very little milk. This is normal. After all, you’ve just spent the first weeks of your baby’s life getting your milk supply into an exact balance with your baby’s needs. It’s the basics of demand and supply, your body is providing what your baby requires, there isn’t supposed to be any extra. What you’re doing by pumping in these early days is building a little bit of a stash, and getting used to pumping. You’re also increasing your milk supply bit by bit. Note: It is important to ensure that breastfeeding is progressing well before you start incorporating pumping. When to pump: The first step in pumping regularly is to start including it into your daily routine. To do this, start by adding a pumping session at about the same time each day. By pumping at about the same time each day, you’re telling your body that it needs to make a little more – tricking it into thinking that your baby has really taken to that 10am feeding! Even if you pump and no milk comes out at all, you’re placing the order for milk to be made later. Learning how to pump: It may take you a while to get the hang of pumping. You may be tense and worried about whether you’ll be able to pump enough (don’t worry, you will). You may be uncomfortable with a machine hooked to your breasts (imagine!). Don’t worry, that’s why you practice. This time pumping at home teaches you how to set up your pump, how to set it so that you get the most milk in the least time, and most importantly, how to relax when you’re pumping. A hands free pumping bra can help you if you are double pumping and find it hard or awkward. How often to pump: When you’re pumping at home to build up your supply and milk stash, once a day is plenty. Don’t make yourself crazy with it! If your baby nurses every two hours, you may need to spread out your pumping sessions a little more, but make them a bit longer than your baby typically nurses. If you don’t have enough time to include pumping sessions during the day, pump when you get up, before work, after your baby goes to bed, or during the night – it can be done, you may just need to get creative! Having an extra set of collection kits can help so the washing and drying doesn’t get overwhelming. If your baby nurses very infrequently, you may need to pump more often, since the baby is usually more efficient at getting the milk out. How long should you pump? In short, you should pump until milk isn’t coming out any more. You don’t need to watch the clock, but it is a good idea to check the bottle to see if it is still flowing. In general, pumping for 15 minutes should do it for most people. (If you’re having trouble letting down for the pump, read Better Pumping, below.) Or, if you’re trying to boost your supply, pump for a few minutes after the milk stops flowing. There is no harm and it’s a great way to send your body the message that more milk is needed (if it is). Breast Pump Settings Contrary to popular belief, your pump does not get the milk out of your breasts by brute force alone. Stronger suction does not necessarily result in more milk. It may however, result in excruciating pain or damage to your breasts. What your pump needs to do to get the most milk out is imitate your baby. Pay attention to how frequently your baby sucks and the strength of that suction. Then try to adjust your pump to match your baby. From there, you can experiment to see if slightly more, less, faster, or slower suction feels better and produces more milk. What’s the best setting? The one that works for you. So don’t pay attention to how other people’s pumps are set, it’s a personal thing. Custom Control makes this easy for you to adapt as your baby changes and grows. Better Pumping Results A few tricks can increase your pumping output without increasing the amount of time it takes. The most effective ways to increase your output (aside from ensuring you have the best pump for your needs) are good relaxation skills and breast compressions – both described here. Breast Compressions Doing breast compressions during pumping can help stimulate additional let-downs, and helps to thoroughly drain all of the milk ducts. While you are pumping, use one hand to massage your breast from the armpits towards the nipple (or as close as you can get without dislodging the pump flange). Gradually increase the pressure, and finish with a few firm squeezes of your breast, like you do when you are hand expressing milk. Relax while Pumping For some people, relaxing while pumping is akin to asking them to relax during a root canal. But it can be done. Relaxing is important, because it’s really hard to have a let-down if you are tense. Here are some tips for relaxation: Positioning: Sit back in your chair, don’t tense your shoulders, and support the bottles so that you don’t have to […]

If you’re pregnant, you may have already started thinking about breastfeeding. You may even have a breastfeeding plan in place. But if you’re considering buying a breast pump while you’re pregnant or adding it to your registry, our advice is to wait. There is comfort in feeling prepared. However, it’s tough to know what you need before your baby arrives. There are so many variables that will make your breastfeeding experience unique, and you won’t know the answers until after you hold your precious bundle in your arms. What if you have breastfeeding challenges and need a hospital grade pump for an extended time? What if your baby refuses the bottle no matter what you try? The choices can be quite overwhelming: single, double, manual, electric, hospital grade, etc. Here are a few things to consider when determining what type of breast pump to buy: Are you planning to use your pump for occasional feedings or are you planning to pump exclusively? If you are planning to exclusively breastfeed with the odd bottle given by dad, grandma, etc., then a manual pump will likely do the trick. A manual pump uses hand-operation to create suction. You can collect as little or as much milk as you desire (comparable to an electric pump) but it is more time consuming and labour-intensive. Manual pumps can be great for travel as they don’t require a power source, or if you are planning to only pump occasionally. If you plan to go back to work while you are still breastfeeding, a double electric pump is a no-brainer. It’s a particularly wise investment if you will be exclusively pumping or if this is your first child and you are planning for more in the future. It will undoubtedly become one of the more useful tools in your parenting arsenal! Double electric pump: These pumps are run by a motor, either plug-in or battery-operated , and allow for pumping both breasts simultaneously with the motor doing the work for you. This will allow you to express more milk in a shorter period of time. Convenient and time-saving, a double electric pump is ideal for busy moms and frequent pumping. Do your research! Breastfeeding is a natural, unique, and rewarding experience for most families. Some will struggle and some won’t, every experience is unique. Should you decide to pump, keep in mind that a pump cannot replace skin-to-skin contact and all the benefits to mom and baby that come with it. Enjoy your pregnancy and when you start thinking about breastfeeding make sure you do your research. Take the time to really consider which pump fits you and your baby’s needs. And buy when the time is right. Breast pumps don’t usually go on sale and waiting until after you have your baby won’t change that. Good luck and happy feeding! Related Products

Bridgeport Hospital Increases Breastfeeding Rates and Prevents Infant Falls with Joeyband   Hospital also sees an increase in patient satisfaction TORONTO (PRWEB) JUNE 20, 2018 Bridgeport Hospital, part of the Yale New Haven Health network, and Joeyband by S2S Innovations, have joined forces to improve breastfeeding rates, patient satisfaction, and eliminate infant falls; Joeyband, an easy-to-use skin-to-skin support system, aims to improve both quality and safety for new mothers and their infants in hospital and at home. Following the Plan, Study, Do, Act quality improvement protocol, Bridgeport Hospital was able to track data related to the implementation, which took place over a 5-month period. Over the course of the study, Bridgeport saw an improvement of 8.2% in exclusive breastfeeding rates, a 7% increase in the number of babies breastfed within the first 60 minutes of birth, and zero infant falls during the course of the study. In addition, Bridgeport’s Press Ganey Satisfaction score, a metric system to measure patient satisfaction, rose 2.1 points, resulting in a 26% increase in Press Ganey percentage rank, as compared to the large Press Ganey database. “Joeyband helps facilitate safe skin-to-skin contact during the most precious golden hour after birth – for our C-Section and Vaginal delivery Moms. All of our Moms may use the Joeyband in their postpartum room to facilitate that bond necessary for breastfeeding success, with the added benefit of infant fall prevention.”, says Kelley Reddington, MSN, RN, RNC-EFM-OB, CNML, Nurse Manager for Bridgeport Hospital, “We provide support to all our Moms to meet their needs and expectations, and the Joeyband has shown to help us achieve that goal.” “Bridgeport is helping to elevate the standard of care for newborns,“ said Hayley Mullins, Inventor of Joeyband. “Not only are they (Bridgeport) educating Moms on the safest option for skin-to-skin, but they are encouraging continued skin-to-skin upon discharge by sending Joeyband home with patients and their families.” ABOUT JOEYBAND, a product of S2S INNOVATIONS, INC. Joeyband, the patented, clinical product of S2S Innovations Inc, is the exclusive skin-to-skin product of La Leche League International, a 2017 AWHONN (Association of Women’s Health, Obstetrics, and Neonatal Nurses) “Trusted Leader,” and the premier product designed to support skin-to-skin and prevent infant falls across the continuum of care – in the Operating Room, Labor/Delivery, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and at home. Joeyband will be exhibiting at AWHONN 2018 in Tampa, FL, June 24-26 – come visit us at booth #301. ABOUT BRIDGEPORT HOSPITAL Bridgeport Hospital is a private, not-for-profit acute care hospital located in Connecticut’s most populous city, primarily serving patients from Fairfield and New Haven Counties. Bridgeport Hospital is a member of the Yale New Haven Health System.